Easy Buttermilk Scones Recipe

The classic buttermilk scones recipe has been in my mind for months, but it felt intimating. The recent images from a well-known London hotel offering classy cream tea made me take the scone recipe more seriously and enhance my culinary creativity. Here it is, made with buttermilk and served with our newly developed clotted cream recipe. Get your flour and buttermilk ready, put on your apron and go straight to the kitchen. Let’s make them!

Buttermilk Scones recipe
Soft and airy buttermilk scones

FAQs -All you need to know about scones

  1. Where did scones originate from?

    Scones are believed to have originated in Scotland. The Oxford English Dictionary reports that the first mention of the word was in 1513 in a Scottish poet. Although scones are traditionally connected with Scotland, Ireland, and England, but no one can tell with certainty who deserves the honor of invention.

  2. Where does their name come from?

    Possible “godfathers or godmothers” include the Gaelic sgonn, a shapeless mass or large mouthful; the Dutch schoonbrood, which is a fine white bread; and the closely related German schöne, meaning fine or beautiful bread. There is also another theory that the word may also be based on the town of Scone in Scotland, the ancient capital of that country.

  3. How are scones made?

    Originally, scones were made with oats, shaped into a large, flat round, scored into four or six triangles and griddle-baked over an open fire. With the progress in baking, and when baking powder became largely available, scones began to be oven-baked and leavened; the round dough was cut into wedges and the scones were baked individually.

  4. What are the main scone ingredients?

    They are traditionally made with wheat flour, sugar, baking powder or baking soda, butter, milk, and eggs, and baked in the oven in the traditional wedge form and in round, square and diamond shapes. This recipe produces a hard, dry texture.

  5. Are scones a dessert?

    Scones are both sweet and savory. As they are served with cream and jam, someone would argue that they are a dessert. They can be made with raisins and currants but are often plain and rely on jam, preserves and lemon curd to get sweeter. They can also be found with dried fruit such as cranberries and dates, nuts, orange rind, and even chocolate chips! The buttermilk scones recipe is traditionally made, and the scones made are plain.

  6. What are scones famous for?

    Well, the famous cream tea! Both Brits and tourists alike enjoy a luxurious afternoon cream tea in a upscale tea shop or a hotel where freshly made scones are served with clotted cream and jam, cups of tea and tea sandwiches. This is an indulgent afternoon tea!

🕐How to make this basic Buttermilk Scones Recipe

  • Add the flour, baking powder, salt, and sugar to a large mixing bowl. Give these dry ingredients a quick stir. Then add cold cubed butter straight from the refrigerator
  • Use your clean hands mix the butter into the dry ingredients
  • Make a well in the middle of the dry ingredients. Pour in your buttermilk. You need it for the homemade buttermilk scones recipe!
  • Using your hands, turn the scone dough on a lightly floured surface and knead it until all ingredients are fully incorporated
  • Make sure not to over mix the mixture, once the ingredients have combined you can proceed to roll out your scone dough to about 1 ½ inch thickness
  • Using a circle shaped 2-inch cookie cutter, cut out the scones (or a simple round cookie cutter)
  • Place your scones on a lightly buttered prepared baking sheet
  • Take 1 egg and beat it with a splash of milk
  • Using a pastry brush, brush the beaten egg on top of the scones and give them an egg wash!
This a bowl with flour and cold cubed butter
Mix the dry ingredients with the cubed butter
Dough for buttermilk scones
The dough is ready!
A picture of six scones in a baking sheet
The scones are ready for the oven
  1. How can I create a buttermilk alternative?

    If you can’t find buttermilk, you can make the buttermilk alternative. Just add ¾ cup sour cream (185 grams) + ¼ cup water (59 ml)

  2. Why do I need to add cold butter into the mix?

    If you’re looking for a flaky texture, cold butter is the way to go. You want the butter to be as solid as possible before working with it in the dough. If you add the butter at room temperature, the texture of the dough becomes softer and more liquid, not ideal for the flakiness you are looking for.
    Making scones can be a little challenging!

More recipes? Try the Queen Elizabeth’s drop scone recipe here

Did you make this? Capture a snapshot of your dessert and share it with us on Instagram by tagging @theistravels or using the hashtag #wedesserts. We can’t wait to admire your creation!

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This is a picture of buttermilk Scones with various fillings

Buttermilk Scones Recipe

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This is a recipe for the classic buttermilk scones
5 from 1 vote
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 40 minutes
Total Time 45 minutes
Course Dessert, Snack
Cuisine British
Servings 12
Calories 296 kcal

Equipment

Ingredients
 
 

For the scones

  • 17.7 ounces plain flour
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 3 tablespoon sugar
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 3 ounces butter
  • 9.3 fluid ounces buttermilk
  • 1 egg

for the Cream Cheese Spread

  • 4.25 ounces cream cheese
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 3.50 ounces sugar

Instructions
 

  • Preheat the oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Add the flour, baking powder, salt and sugar to a mixing bowl of your choice. Give these dry ingredients a quick stir.
  • Take your butter directly from the refrigerator and cube it roughly.
  • Add the cold cubed butter to the bowl and using your clean hands mix the butter into the dry ingredients. Allow your fingers to work the butter into the flour making sure no large cubes remain.
  • Make a well in the middle of the dry ingredients. Pour in your buttermilk directly into the dry ingredients.
  • Using a butter knife stir the buttermilk thoroughly into the flour until a sticky dough has been formed.
  • Using your hands, turn the dough on your kitchen surface and knead it until all ingredients are fully incorporated.
  • Make sure not to over mix the mixture, once the ingredients have combined you can proceed to roll out your dough to abut 1 ½ inch thickness.
  • Using a circle shaped 5 cm cutter, cut out the scones. Once you have cut out as many scones as you can, reroll the remaining dough and repeat process.
  • Place your scones on a lightly buttered baking sheet.
  • Take 1 egg and beat it with a splash of milk. Using a pastry brush, brush the beaten egg on top of the scones.
  • Place in oven for baking for 12-15 minutes or until they are golden brown and doubled in size.
  • Enjoy fresh out of oven with filling of your choice.
  • For the cream cheese spread, mix all ingredients together in a bowl with a hand mixer for a minute. You can then use it as a filling for the buttermilk scones.

Notes

  • If you can’t find buttermilk, you can make the buttermilk alternative. Just add ¾ cup sour cream (185 grams) + ¼ cup water (59 ml)
  • Serve the buttermilk scones with the filling of your choice including our cream cheese spread. You can also use:
  • Fresh cream
  • Clotted Cream
  • Fresh fruit
  • Jam
  • Butter
  • Yoghurt

Nutrition

Serving: 1Calories: 296kcalCarbohydrates: 45gProtein: 6gFat: 10gSaturated Fat: 6gPolyunsaturated Fat: 1gMonounsaturated Fat: 3gTrans Fat: 1gCholesterol: 40mgSodium: 256mgPotassium: 96mgFiber: 1gSugar: 13gVitamin A: 346IUCalcium: 105mgIron: 2mg
Keyword buttermilk scones
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